Outdoors for All

By Richard Louv, Sierra magazine, Apr 25 2019 [Louv is the author of Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder]

A nascent global movement proclaims that access to nature is a human right

A FEW YEARS AGO, pediatrician and clinical scientist Nooshin Razani treated a four-year-old girl whose family had recently fled Yemen and settled in the San Francisco Bay Area. The family had received news the night before that members of the father’s family had been killed in a bombing back home. The child was suffering from anxiety. “I was thinking, ‘I have nothing to give to this little girl. What can I give her?'” Razani says. The typical medical response would be to offer the girl some counseling and, if necessary, medication. Razani decided the patient needed an additional, broader prescription. She asked the girl and her parents if they would like to go to the park with her. “The expression on that child’s face, the yearning for a piece of childhood, was deeply moving,” the doctor recalls.

Razani is the founder of the Center for Nature and Health, which conducts research on the connection between time in nature and health and is the nation’s first nature-based clinic associated with a major health provider, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland, California. The clinic collaborates with the East Bay Regional Park District to offer a program called Stay Healthy in Nature Everyday. Participating physicians share local park maps with their patients and offer family nature outings–70 of them so far. Often, the physicians will join the outings. Burned-out doctors need these experiences too, Razani says….

read more at Sierra

Non-toxic lawns & gardens and weed-free sidewalks

Thursday, April 25⋅6:30 – 8:30pm

“Non-toxic lawns & gardens and weed-free sidewalks,” April 25. Doors open at 6:30 so come then for exhibits. Talk begins at 7:00.

Two related topics: non-toxic ways to grow great lawns and vegetables and to keep weeds out of sidewalks. A green double-header presented by the West Chester Green Team, which includes 4CP, Ready for 100, Plastic-Free Please, and Don’t Spray Me!

This is the first in the Green Team’s hot button environmental series, addressing issues at the forefront of people’s thinking at this time in our history.

Andy Yencha from Penn State Extension speaker’s bureau in Cumberland County will speak on “Greening you Lawn, Naturally” and Dr. John Jackson, entomologist, will speak on “Bugs and Weeds Away–the Natural Way.” Q&A follows.

Business and Public Management Center, 50 Sharpless St., West Chester 19382. Park across the street in the Sharpless Parking Garage.

More info: mhudgings@gmail.com

Pete Seeger 100th Anniversary Concert

Benefits West Chester Green Team, a member of CCEA

Friday, May 3,7:30 – 9:30pm
501 S. High St, West Chester, PA 19328

Pete Seeger 100th Anniversary Concert Pete Seeger – the iconic folksinger, activist, songwriter, and organizer – was born on May 3, 1919. Come celebrate the 100th anniversary of Pete’s birth with folk musicians Two of a Kind, Dan Schatz, and Doug Morris, plus special guests. The concert, held at the Unitarian Congregation of West Chester, will benefit the congregation and the new West Chester Green Team, which supports environmental initiatives in greater West Chester. Suggested donation is $20 – more if you can, less if you can’t, and no one turned away.

WCU fights waste, recycles possessions from spring to fall

from WCU Office of Sustainability Earth Week Bulletin, 4/22/19:

WCU Pack It Up – Pass It On
Earth Week: The Donation Drive Begins!

Students, as you sort through your possessions, packing up for the summer months, are you finding items you no longer wish to keep? Before you toss them, consider donating instead! Pack It Up-Pass It On is a campus wide initiative aimed at rescuing and rehoming unwanted clothing and household items. Donation bins have been placed in the lobby areas of all eight traditional and affiliated residence halls as well as the Village Clubhouse. If your items are in good condition, simply deposit them in these conveniently located bins and know that they will find new life and use with someone else! All items will go to a campus yard sale at the start of the fall semester (keep checking back for dates)! The proceeds of the sale will go towards supporting the program for the next year.

Off campus students, open drop off hours will be available to you from 11am to 2pm on Saturday 4/27, 5/4, and 5/11 at the South Campus storage containers. The containers are located in Y Lot by the South Campus Apartments on South Campus Drive. Look for the signs! Email wcupacknpass@gmail.com with any questions. And look for the Pack It Up – Pass It On table at Tuesday’s Earth Fair (donations of smaller items and clothing accepted at this time). Let’s ditch the dumpster WCU!

What is Earth Day, and what is it meant to accomplish?

by Kathleen Rogers, president, Earth Day Network

On April 22, 1970, millions of people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development.

In the U.S. and around the world, smog was becoming deadly and evidence was growing that pollution led to developmental delays in children. Biodiversity was in decline as a result of the heavy use of pesticides and other pollutants.

The global ecological awareness was growing, and the US Congress and President Nixon responded quickly. In July of the same year, they created the Environmental Protection Agency, and robust environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act, among many.

One billion people

Earth Day is now a global event each year, and we believe that more than 1 billion people in 192 countries now take part in what is the largest civic-focused day of action in the world.

It is a day of political action and civic participation. People march, sign petitions, meet with their elected officials, plant trees, clean up their towns and roads. Corporations and governments use it to make pledges and announce sustainability measures. Faith leaders, including Pope Francis, connect Earth Day with protecting God’s greatest creations, humans, biodiversity and the planet that we all live on.

Earth Day Network, the organization that leads Earth Day worldwide, has chosen as the theme for 2018 to End Plastic Pollution, including creating support for a global effort to eliminate primarily single-use plastics along with global regulation for the disposal of plastics. EDN is educating millions of people about the health and other risks associated with the use and disposal of plastics, including pollution of our oceans, water, and wildlife, and about the growing body of evidence that plastic waste is creating serious global problems.

From poisoning and injuring marine life to the ubiquitous presence of plastics in our food to disrupting human hormones and causing major life-threatening diseases and early puberty, the exponential growth of plastics is threatening our planet’s survival….

read more at Earth Day Network