Non-toxic lawns & gardens and weed-free sidewalks

Thursday, April 25⋅6:30 – 8:30pm

“Non-toxic lawns & gardens and weed-free sidewalks,” April 25. Doors open at 6:30 so come then for exhibits. Talk begins at 7:00.

Two related topics: non-toxic ways to grow great lawns and vegetables and to keep weeds out of sidewalks. A green double-header presented by the West Chester Green Team, which includes 4CP, Ready for 100, Plastic-Free Please, and Don’t Spray Me!

This is the first in the Green Team’s hot button environmental series, addressing issues at the forefront of people’s thinking at this time in our history.

Andy Yencha from Penn State Extension speaker’s bureau in Cumberland County will speak on “Greening you Lawn, Naturally” and Dr. John Jackson, entomologist, will speak on “Bugs and Weeds Away–the Natural Way.” Q&A follows.

Business and Public Management Center, 50 Sharpless St., West Chester 19382. Park across the street in the Sharpless Parking Garage.

More info: mhudgings@gmail.com

Yes, climate change is costly

Chart from “Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters: Overview” at National Centers for Environmental Information, NOAA. The last 3 years have been way above average (adjusted for changes in GPI) in the number of weather events with damage over one billion dollars in the US, and 2019 is starting out the same way. Military bases are among the affected areas (see here).

When nature harms itself: Five scary climate feedback loops

DW, 4/5/18

The thing about climate change is, the worse it gets – the worse it gets. Feedback loops accelerate the warming process. Now, scientists looking at lakes have found yet another alarming vicious circle to add to the list.

Lakes make a tiny fraction of the world’s water, but they’re home to lots of plants and animals. They’re often situated in the midst of still more biodiversity, in the form of forest. At least, they used to be.

Lately, forests have been vanishing, while aquatic plants continue to thrive. Due to this change, the lakes of the northern hemisphere could almost double their methane emissions over the next 50 years, new research has shown. Why? Climate change.

This increase of emissions will further contribute to global warming, in what scientists call a positive climate feedback loop.

And it’s just the latest addition to a growing list of ways we’re altering natural processes with spiraling impacts on the climate and carbon cycle….

read more, see images and diagrams, and follow links at DW

Uwchlan Township Launches Sustainability Initiatives

Uwchlan Township has started 2019 with a commitment to move toward greater environmental sustainability. On Monday April 8th, the Board of Supervisors passed a resolution encouraging township businesses and residents to reduce the use of singe use plastic bags and straws.

This resolution follows a commitment by the township to move toward renewable energy with the ‘Ready for 100’ resolution passed during the February Board of Supervisors meeting. These efforts were led by the Uwchlan Environmental Advisory Council (EAC), which was formed under the leadership of Supervisor Mayme Bauman in 2018.

Supervisor Bauman states “Uwchlan Township is fortunate to have actively engaged citizens who care a lot about their community and are willing to dedicate their time and expertise to help the township tackle various environmental issues. I am proud to support the work of our EAC volunteers, which will help put our community on a path toward a cleaner environment and a more sustainable future.”

The Single Use Plastics resolution kicks off a “Sustainable Uwchlan” campaign planned for the township, including the launch of the Environmental Stewards program. This is a family friendly passport activity created for area families as a fun way to learn more about our environment and encourage environmental stewardship among residents of all ages. Participants are invited to complete environmental tasks and activities throughout 2019 to earn recognition in the fall as an Honorary Environmental Steward of Uwchlan Township.

Uwchlan EAC Chair Laura Obenski said ‘The EAC us excited to host a series of educational events and initiatives to provide guidance on how we can collectively, as a community, work to preserve our most valuable asset- the environment. Modeling and encouraging responsible environmental stewardship and engaging our youngest community members serves an important role in sustaining and preserving our community for generations to come.“

The Uwchlan EAC is also hosting a community event at the township campus this Wednesday, April 17th at 6:30pm featuring Kendra McMillin, Forest Health Program Specialist with the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Kendra will be speaking with residents and answering questions about the Emerald Ash Borer and Spotted Lanternfly.

On Saturday May 11th, a Sustainable Uwchlan Open House will be held outdoors at the township building from 11-2p. This family friendly event will provide an opportunity for residents to learn about local environmental initiatives and provide information on a variety of topics such as recycling, native gardening, and renewable energy.

Photo above: Taryn Steinmeyer of Uwchlan Township checks a tree in her yard for Spotted Lanternfly eggs with her mom, Paige, as part of Uwchlan’s Environmental Steward Passport program.

More information on these events can be found on http://www.uwchlan.com.
# # #
Contact:
Laura Obenski
Uwchlan Township EAC Chair
484-947-6149
eac@uwchlan.com
Uwchlan.com/276/Sustainable-Uwchlan

Why climate change is a national security issue

Besides the threat of climate refugees desperate to escape droughts and storms trying to migrate (as is the case already with some pressing at the US-Mexican border), US military bases such as the often-flooded Naval Station in Norfolk VA are also in jeopardy.

Emailed by the national Sierra Club, this photo of Offutt Air Force Base in Sarpy County, Nebraska, shows damage from the recent flooding there (photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force taken by Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake):

Here is the Sierrra Club comment:

Exacerbating Circumstances

Was climate change the cause of last month’s “bomb cyclones” and catastrophic flooding in Nebraska, Wisconsin, South Dakota, and Iowa? No one can say for sure, although the magnitude of recent storms, floods, and wildfires—and the fact that the 18 hottest years on record have all been since 2001—certainly suggest a correlation. “Climate change is here,” says Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune. “We can’t stop the rain if it comes, and we can’t stop the rivers from rising….

Local lawmakers, municipal leaders push for renewable energy

Daily Local News, Apr 2, 2019

WEST WHITELAND—Local lawmakers and municipal leaders found out what it will take to transition to 100 percent renewable energy at PennEnvironment and Sierra Club’s Chester County Ready for 100 program in West Whiteland.

More than 150 Chester County residents explored clean energy and energy efficiency at the expo Saturday, and learned how they can transition their homes to cleaner resources to help reduce carbon footprint.

“I am very pleased to see the current focus on our environment and climate change,” said state Rep. Christina Sappey. “We have a responsibility to next generations to take immediate action to protect and preserve what we’ve done right, correct what we haven’t and implement strategies that get us to 100 percent renewable energy. It’s for these reasons I am honored to do whatever I can to work with our environmental advocacy partners towards this goal.”

The event also featured a panel discussion, “Our Clean Energy Future,” which engaged attendees in a discussion about how to push our communities and the state of Pennsylvania to transition away from dirty fossil fuels. The panel featured local elected officials and energy experts who showcased the existing momentum there is to transition away from dirty fossil fuels and how our community can help.

“Climate change is real,” said Congresswoman Chrissy Houlahan. “It is happening, and we do cause it. It is something that as a country we, and frankly, a world, we need to deal with as quickly, as rapidly, and as aggressively as we possibly can.”

Houlahan is a cosponsor of The Climate Solutions Act which calls for 100 percent Renewable Energy by 2035 and sets greenhouse gas emission targets to 80 percent of 1990 levels by 2050….

read more at Daily Local News